Latest News

Please find below, the latest news from the BBKA and National Bee Unit

BBKA

  • Swarm removal
    on 24th May 2022 at 12:44 pm

    In summer we get many calls and questions from people with bees in their houses, outbuildings and gardens.   There are over 250 types of bees in the UK but there is only one european honey bee (Apis mellifera).  As well as honey bees there are around 24 species of bumblebee and over 240 species of solitary bee in the UK.  Please see below to help identify what type of bee you have and who to approach for help and information.   If you have honey bees in the structure of your property Click here. If you feel you need to have the bees destroyed please contact a local reputable pest control company.  Bees are endangered but they are not protected.  Click here for the link to the Health & Safety Executive guide to Honey bees and biocides:  Our volunteers beekeepers can only assist in cases of swarms OF HONEY BEES. See our page of photos of honeybee swarms To Jump straight to the Swarm map click here To support the work of the BBKA pl...

  • Honeybee Swarms Gallery
    on 24th May 2022 at 12:42 pm

    A honeybee colony swarming is a natural process. It is the colony reproducing by the old queen leaving with some of the bees. They leave their hive and find somewhere to hang in a cluster until the scout bees decide on their new home. If you think you've got a swarm please use our Swarm Collector map to find a local beekeeper to come and remove the honeybees. The photos below have been shared by our members to show you some of the beautiful examples of swarms that you might see. Sometimes the swarm really stands out!  And sometimes not!  This swarm (photos by Joe Smith from Darlington) was almost hidden Swarms have less to land on in towns!    This is not a normal bin collection!  Here's a swarm on a bin being collected!  Sometimes they land on a wall Or a gate post Or on a bridge Sometimes they're huge! This photo from a member of NSBKA was the biggest swarm (and the easiest to collect) that the exper...

  • World Bee Day Events
    on 23rd May 2022 at 3:16 pm

    World Bee Day Events  World Bee Day is 20th May  The public can help bees by planting bee friendly plants in their gardens and encouraging their councils to plant wildflower meadows and leave grass verges alone to allow wildflowers to bloom.  Here in the UK May is a busy time for beekeepers who are tending their bees and watching them progress into strong colonies and often bringing in a spring honey crop - depending on the weather and forage available. A message from British Beekeeper's Chair Stephen Barnes YouTube Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AUatPnc3aY4 British beekeepers' Association offers leaflets and information about planting for bees and has a Planting for bees quarterly blog available to encourage the public to help support bees by planting more food. During May BBKA also supports 'No Mow May' where the public are asked to not mow their lawns for a month to allow wild f...

  • Corporate Donors
    on 23rd May 2022 at 3:14 pm

    BBKA would like to extend a huge thank you to our sponsors: 2BScientific 2BScientific Limited is a Life Science Reagents distributor providing a novel, high-quality and personal approach to the supply of research reagents. They provide novel solutions relevant to today’s researchers and they contribute £1 for every order helping us to fund research into essential studies to help understand and reverse the bees decline. Long may this wonderful support continue! For more information please visit:  https://www.2bscientific.com/ *** Fiorelli Sell over a million bags a year and say "A cause very close to our hearts at Fiorelli is the British Beekeepers Association. Bees are a cornerstone species and we must protect them." They have designed a capsule collection of bags named after plants the bees like, Lavender Grab, Snowdrop backpack and Cosmos body bag. They will give £10 from each sale to the BBKA.  For more information please visit their webs...

National Bee Unit 

  • A confirmed finding of a single Asian hornet in Felixstowe, Suffolk
    on 29th April 2022 at 12:00 am

    The National Bee Unit is carrying out enhanced monitoring and awareness raising together with local beekeepers after a single insect, confirmed to be Vespa velutina was killed at a sentinel apiary, reported by a beekeeper.Laboratory analysis has shown that the Asian hornet was a female but as it was dried out and damaged it couldn’t be ascertained if it was a queen or worker. Additionally it is highly likely to be from the European population rather than a new introduction from Asia and is highly unlikely to be the offspring of either of last year’s nests in the UK.Further information regarding the yellow legged Asian hornet can be found on Defra's Asian Hornet sightings page and on BeeBase’s Asian hornet page. Please direct all media enquiries to the Defra Press Office: 0330 0416560We continue to ask beekeepers to remain vigilant, record monitoring trap locations on BeeBase (guidance here) and report suspect sightings here.

  • Registration Page - Error - FIXED
    on 24th March 2022 at 12:00 am

    We are currently experiencing an error with our registration page which is preventing beekeepers from registering.  We are working hard to find a fix and will update this News items as soon as a fix is found. To register, please come back in a few days or give the NBU a call on 0300 3030094 and we can process your registartion for you. UPDATE: This has now been fixed. 

  • Analysis of 2021 Asian hornet nests
    on 3rd March 2022 at 12:00 am

    During the 2021 season, two Asian hornet nests were located and successfully destroyed by NBU inspectors and APHA colleagues, following sightings reported via the Asian Hornet Watch app.The nest found in Ascot, and destroyed on 11th October, was 35 cm in diameter and contained six combs. Results from genetic analyses suggest that all Asian hornets collected in the surrounding area were likely to have come from this nest, and that the nest hadn’t reached the stage of producing adult sexual stages.The nest found in Portsmouth, and destroyed on 31st October, was 31cm in diameter and contained 4 combs. Results from genetic analyses suggest that all Asian hornets collected in the surrounding area were likely to have come from this nest. The nest had reached the stage of producing sexual stages but was highly inbred and a large proportion of the offspring were triploid.The queen and drones for both the Ascot and Portsmouth nest were highly unlikely to be direct offspring of the Gosport nest from 2020.Further information regarding Asian hornet can be found on Defra’s Asian hornet sightings page and on our BeeBase Asian hornet page. Please direct all media enquiries to the Defra Press Office: 0330 0416560.Use the Asian hornet Watch app for Android and iPhone to report sightings.Yn ystod tymor 2021, cafodd dau nyth cacwn Asiaidd eu darganfod a'u dinistrio'n llwyddiannus gan arolygwyr yr NBU a chydweithwyr APHA, yn dilyn golygfeydd a adroddwyd drwy'r ap ‘Hornet Watch’ Asiaidd.Cafodd y nyth a ganfuwyd yn Ascot ei ddinistrio ar yr 11eg o Hydref. Roedd yn 35 cm mewn diamedr ac yn cynnwys chwe adran i atgenhedlu. Mae canlyniad y dadansoddiadau genetig yn awgrymu bod yr holl gacwn Asiaidd a gasglwyd yn yr ardal gyfagos yn debygol o fod wedi dod o'r nyth hwn, ac nad oedd y nyth wedi cyrraedd y cam lle y caiff ffurfiau rhywiol llawn dwf eu cynhyrchu.Roedd y nyth a ganfuwyd yn Portsmouth, a'i ddinistrio ar 31 Hydref, yn 31cm mewn diamedr ac yn cynnwys 4 adran i atgenhedlu. Mae canlyniad y dadansoddiadau genetig yn awgrymu bod yr holl gacwn Asiaidd a gasglwyd yn yr ardal gyfagos yn debygol o fod wedi dod o'r nyth hwn. Roedd y nyth wedi cyrraedd y cam lle y caiff ffurfiau rhywiol llawn dwf eu cynhyrchu ond roedd wedi mewnfridio i raddau helaeth ac roedd cyfran fawr o’r epil yn driploid.Roedd y frenhines a'r dronau ar gyfer nyth Ascot a Portsmouth yn annhebygol iawn o fod yn uniongyrchol o’r nyth darganfyddwyd yn Gosport yn ystod 2020.Mae rhagor o wybodaeth am y gacynen Asiaidd ar gael ar dudalen golygfeydd cyrn Asiaidd Defra ac ar ein tudalen cyrn Asiaidd BeeBase. Dylech gyfeirio pob ymholiad gan y cyfryngau at Swyddfa'r Wasg Defra: 0330 0416560.Defnyddiwch yr ap Gwylio Hornet Asiaidd ar gyfer Android ac iPhone i roi gwybod am olygfeydd.

  • NBU question time – A hive autopsy?
    on 1st March 2022 at 12:00 am

    Join regional bee inspectors John Geden and Maggie Gill and seasonal bee inspector Eleanor Burgess to find out about the common causes of colony losses over the winter and what can be done to prevent them. A hive autopsy will look at the signs and symptoms of starvation, varroosis, failing queens and other issues your overwintering bees can experience. Tuesday 15th March from 7:30pm – 9:00pm via Teams -  Register here Questions and photos can be submitted in advance to beekeepers@apha.gov.uk